Our mission is to inform and support men living with prostate cancer, while helping them enjoy their best life possible.

190,000 Men

in the USA are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year

3+ Million Men

Diagnosed in the USA with prostate cancer

33,000 Men

in the USA die from prostate cancer each year.

What is Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer is cancer that occurs in the prostate — a small walnut-shaped gland in men that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm.

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Usually prostate cancer grows slowly and is initially confined to the prostate gland, where it may not cause serious harm. However, while some types of prostate cancer grow slowly and may need minimal or even no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly.

Prostate cancer that’s detected early — when it’s still confined to the prostate gland — has a better chance of successful treatment.

A Risk Assessment can help you better understand where to start your prostate cancer journey

A PSA test is a common way to begin  assessing one’s risk of prostate cancer

Tele-consult with a physician to answer questions and obtain a referral to a specialist

Screenings usually include a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test and a Digital Rectal Exam. 

PSA test measures the level of PSA in the blood. PSA is a substance made by the prostate. The levels of PSA in the blood can be higher in men who have prostate cancer. The PSA level may also be elevated in other conditions.

DRE is a test that is done when a doctor or nurse inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to estimate the size of the prostate and feel for lumps or other abnormalities.

If a DRE or PSA test detects an abnormality, your doctor may recommend further tests to determine whether you have prostate cancer, such as:

  • Ultrasound: If other tests raise concerns, your doctor may use transrectal ultrasound to further evaluate your prostate. A small probe, about the size and shape of a cigar, is inserted into your rectum. The probe uses sound waves to create a picture of your prostate gland.
  • Collecting a sample of prostate tissue: If initial test results suggest prostate cancer, your doctor may recommend a procedure to collect a sample of cells from your prostate (prostate biopsy). Prostate biopsy is often done using a thin needle that’s inserted into the prostate to collect tissue. The tissue sample is analyzed in a lab to determine whether cancer cells are present.
  • MRI fusion: While still being developed worldwide, MRI fusion to assist in prostate biopsy and diagnosis is being used more and more.
  • ProstaMetrix: a minimally invasive medical device designed to accurately measure the volume of the prostate gland early in the diagnosis process. Accurate prostate volume measurement helps physicians assess a patient’s prostate status to better plan and monitor treatments, drug therapies, and determine recommendations for prostate biopsies versus active surveillance. 

When a biopsy confirms the presence of cancer, the next step is to determine the level of aggressiveness (grade) of the cancer cells. A laboratory pathologist examines a sample of your cancer to determine how much cancer cells differ from the healthy cells. A higher grade indicates a more aggressive cancer that is more likely to spread quickly.

Hear Their Stories

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Kelvin Black
From Dallas, USA
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Zasha Swan
From Australia
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Frank Jones
From Japan
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Jack Brownn
From London, UK