Risk Assessment

 Physicians may suspect prostate cancer based on the results of a blood test called PSA (prostate specific antigen) and a digital rectal examination. If the results of these are suspicious, further tests may be conducted to try and determine if prostate cancer is present.

A Risk Assessment can help you better understand where to start your prostate cancer journey

DRE

Doctors use the digital rectal exam (DRE) as a relatively simple test to check the prostate. Because the prostate is an internal organ, your doctor cannot look at it directly. But because the prostate lies in front of the rectum, he or she can feel it by inserting a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum.be conducted to try and determine if prostate cancer is present.https://youtu.be/RI7ghlGMTSk

PSA

The PSA test is a blood test used primarily to screen for prostate cancer. The test measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood. PSA is a protein produced by both cancerous and noncancerous tissue in the prostate, a small gland that sits below the bladder in men.

For a more accurate risk assessment consider ordering a PSA Test  

Prosta-Metrix

The ProstaMetric System is designed to measure the volume of the prostate with a unique measurement device – the fingertip optical encoder. The device is used coincident with a normal DRE exam allowing physicians to record prostate volume early in the diagnostic process and throughout monitoring or treatment without the need for costly imaging technologies like trans rectal ultrasound or MRI.

Other Blood Tests

Phi- The Prostate Health Index combines three blood tests that give a more accurate “Phi Score,” which gives accurate information based on a high PSA to better determine the probability of finding cancer during a biopsy.

PCA3- A urine test that more accurately detects the possibility of prostate cancer by examining the expression of PCA3 – a gene specific to prostate cancer. The PCA3 score is used to determine the need for repeated biopsies. Research has continued for years to look into whether PCA3 can replace or serves as a substitute for the PSA test.

4KScore- A blood test providing patient-specific probability of finding an aggressive form of prostate cancer during a biopsy. Doctors and patients can then make an informed decision on whether to have a biopsy. The test measures total PSA, free PSA, Intact PSA and for certain enzymes called kallikrein. An algorithm used with the patient’s age and physical exam gives a probability percentage of having aggressive disease.

ExoDx Prostate- A simple, non-invasive urine test to assess your risk of having clinically significant high-grade prostate cancer. The ExoDx Prostate Test does not require a digital rectal exam (DRE) and provides an individualized risk score that can help determine to whether to proceed or defer a prostate biopsy.

Imaging

TRUS- A Transrectal Ultrasound may also be called prostate sonogram or endorectal ultrasound. It is used to look at the prostate and tissues around it. An ultrasound transducer (also called a probe) sends sound waves through the wall of the rectum and into the prostate and surrounding tissue. A computer analyzes the wave patterns (called echoes) as they bounce off the organs and converts them into an image that doctors view on a video screen.

MRI- A Magnetic Resonance Imaging a test that creates a detailed image of an area inside the body. An MRI provides a more detailed image than the ultrasound procedure, and allows doctors to spot parts of the prostate that don’t look healthy and should be examined with a biopsy needle.

Biopsy

If the results of a PSA blood test, DRE, or other tests suggest that you might have prostate cancer, your will most likely need a prostate biopsy.

A biopsy is a procedure in which small samples of the prostate are removed and then looked at with a microscope. A core needle biopsy is the main method used to diagnose prostate cancer. It is usually done by a urologist.

During the biopsy, the doctor usually looks at the prostate with an imaging test such as transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) or MRI, or a ‘fusion’ of the two (all discussed below). The doctor quickly inserts a thin, hollow needle into the prostate. This is done either through the wall of the rectum (a transrectal biopsy) or through the skin between the scrotum and anus (a transperineal biopsy). When the needle is pulled out it removes a small cylinder (core) of prostate tissue. This is repeated several times. Most often the doctor will take about 12 core samples from different parts of the prostate.

Radical Prostatectomy

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Brachy Therapy

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Other Therapies

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Do Nothing

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Hear Their Stories

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Kelvin Black
From Dallas, USA
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Zasha Swan
From Australia
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Frank Jones
From Japan
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Jack Brownn
From London, UK